Advanced Placement

AP Night Information Packet  - 2018

AP Night Packet 2018.pdf

AP Course Descriptions

ARTS

AP MUSIC THEORY

A major component of any college curriculum in music is a course introducing the first-year student to music theory, a subject that comprises the musical materials and procedures of the Common Practice period. Such a course may bear a variety of titles (Basic Musicianship, Elementary Theory, Harmony and Dictation, Structure of Music, etc). It may emphasize one aspect of music, such as harmony; more often, however, it integrates aspects of melody, harmony, texture, rhythm, form, musical analysis, elementary composition, and to some extent, history and style. Musicianship skills such as dictation and other listening skills, sight-singing, and keyboard harmony are considered an important part of the theory course, although they may be taught as separate classes. {read more}

AP STUDIO ART (2-D DESIGN, 3-D DESIGN, DRAWING)

The AP Studio Art portfolios are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. AP Studio Art is not based on a written examination; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. Most AP Studio Art candidates prepare their portfolios through organized AP instruction. If your school does not offer an AP Studio Art program, you may work independently to complete the portfolio. It is vital that you plan far enough in advance so that you can complete the portfolio on time. {read more about 2-D Design} {read more about 3-D Design} {read more about Drawing}

 

ENGLISH

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

The AP English Language and Composition course is designed to help you become a skilled reader of a variety of texts as well as becoming a skilled writer. You’ll achieve this through awareness of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the ways that writing rules and language use contribute to effective writing. The AP English Language and Composition course is intended to give you the experience of an introductory-level composition course in college. The composition course is one of the most varied in the college, since an introductory composition course at one college may address topics and require types of writing that might be very different from an introductory composition course at another college. {read more}

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

The AP English Literature and Composition course is designed to help you engage in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, you can deepen your understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. In the course, you’ll learn to consider a work's structure, style, and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. {read more}

 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

The AP course in Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. Comparison assists both in identifying problems and in analyzing policymaking. For example, we only know that a country has a high population growth rate or serious corruption when we compare it to other countries. Careful comparison of political systems produces useful knowledge about the policies countries have effectively initiated to address problems, or, indeed, what they have done to make things worse. We can compare the effectiveness of policy approaches to poverty or overpopulation by examining how different countries solve similar problems. {read more}

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY

The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of the AP program in European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European History, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing. {read more}

AP MACROECONOMICS

An AP course in Macroeconomics is designed to give you a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops your familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics. {read more}

AP MICROECONOMICS

The purpose of an AP course in Microeconomics is to provide a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. {read more}

AP PSYCHOLOGY

The purpose of the AP course in Psychology is to introduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. An introductory college course in psychology is generally one semester in length, with some variation among colleges. An AP course in psychology need not follow any specific college curriculum. Rather, the aim is to provide a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory psychology courses.{read more}

AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

The AP U.S. Government and Politics course involves the study of democratic ideas, balance of powers, and tension between the practical and ideal in national policymaking. Students analyze and discuss the importance of various constitutional principles, rights and procedures, institutions, and political processes that impact us as citizens. {read more}

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY

The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and enduring understandings necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials — their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance — and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP United States History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in an essay format. {read more}

AP WORLD HISTORY

The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and enduring understandings necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials — their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance — and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP United States History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in an essay format. {read more}

 

MATH AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

AP CALCULUS AB

Calculus AB is designed to be taught over a full high school academic year. It is possible to spend some time on elementary functions and still cover the Calculus AB curriculum within a year. However, if students are to be adequately prepared for the Calculus AB examination, most of the year must be devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. These topics are the focus of the AP Exam. {read more}

AP CALCULUS BC

Calculus BC can be offered by schools that are able to complete all the prerequisites before the course. Calculus BC is a full-year course in the calculus of functions of a single variable. It includes all topics covered in Calculus AB plus additional topics. Both courses represent college-level mathematics for which most colleges grant advanced placement and credit. The content of Calculus BC is designed to qualify the student for placement and credit in a course that is one course beyond that granted for Calculus AB. {read more}

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A

Computer Science A emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with an emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester course in computer science. It also includes the study of data structures and abstraction. {read more}

AP STATISTICS

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes. Students who successfully complete the course and examination may receive credit and/or advanced placement for a one-semester introductory college statistics course. This does not necessarily imply that the high school course should be one semester long. Each high school will need to determine the length of time for its AP Statistics course to best serve the needs of its students. Statistics, like some other AP courses, could be effectively studied in a one-semester, a two-trimester, or a one-year course. Most schools, however, offer it as a two-semester course. {read more}

 

SCIENCES

AP BIOLOGY

The AP Biology course is designed to enable you to develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. The result will be readiness for the study of advanced topics in subsequent college courses — a goal of every AP course. This AP Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course and has been endorsed enthusiastically by higher education officials. {read more}

AP CHEMISTRY

With the ever-increasing need for innovators, problem finders, and designers of materials, pharmaceuticals, and even new fuels, comes the need for individuals skilled in the science practices and knowledgeable about chemistry. The redesigned Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry course provides students with training for such knowledge and skills through guided inquiry labs, a more focused curriculum on content relevant to today's problems, and an exam that assesses students' mental models of the particulate nature of matter instead of memorization of rules to understand chemistry. {read more}

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The following themes provide a foundation for the structure of the AP Environmental Science course. {read more}

AP PHYSICS C: MECHANICS

This course ordinarily forms the first part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. The sequence is parallel to or preceded by mathematics courses that include calculus. Methods of calculus are used wherever appropriate in formulating physical principles and in applying them to physical problems. Strong emphasis is placed on solving a variety of challenging problems, some requiring calculus. The subject matter of the AP Physics C: Mechanics course is classical mechanics and includes topics in kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion, work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; oscillations; and gravitation. The AP Physics C: Mechanics course is the first part of a sequence which in college is sometimes a very intensive one-year course but often extends over one and one-half to two years, with a laboratory component. {read more}

 

WORLD LANGUAGES AND CULTURES

AP FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

The AP French Language and Culture course is designed to promote proficiency in French and to enable you to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. {read more}

AP GERMAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

The AP German Language and Culture course is designed to promote proficiency in German and to enable you to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. {read more}

AP LATIN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

AP Latin is designed to provide advanced high school students with a rich and rigorous Latin course, approximately equivalent to an upper-intermediate (typically fourth or fifth semester) college or university Latin course. After you have successfully completed the course, you will be able to read, understand, translate, and analyze Latin poetry and prose. {read more}

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is comparable to a high intermediate or advanced low level college or university Spanish language course. Emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication in real life tasks, it focuses on developing your abilities in the three modes of communication (Interpretive, Interpersonal, and Presentational) and strengthening your cultural competencies through theme-based instruction based on a variety of authentic resources, such as: newspapers, magazines, podcasts, blogs, advertisements, television programs, films, music, video clips, and literature, Grammar and vocabulary are developed through contextualized study. {read more}